Climate negotiators’ and scientists’ assessments of the climate negotiations

Climate negotiators’ and scientists’ assessments of the climate negotiations

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Climate negotiators’ and scientists’ assessments of the climate negotiations

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Title Climate negotiators’ and scientists’ assessments of the climate negotiations
URI http://doi.org/10.7802/1478
Primary Researcher Dannenberg, Astrid;Kassel University
Publication Year 2017
Availability Freier Zugang (mit Registrierung)
Contributor Zitzelsberger, Sonja;Kassel University;Researcher
Tavoni, Alessandro;Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics, London WC2A 2AE, UK;Researcher
Subject Area International Relations, International Politics, Foreign Affairs, Development Policy
Social Psychology
Economics
Topic Classification Natural Environment, Nature
International Institutions, Relations, Conditions
Abstract Climate negotiation outcomes are difficult to evaluate objectively because there are no clear reference scenarios. Subjective assessments from those directly involved in the negotiations are particularly important, as this may influence strategy and future negotiation participation. Here we analyse the perceived success of the climate negotiations in a sample of 656 experts involved in international climate policy. Respondents were pessimistic when asked for specific assessments of the current approach centred on voluntary pledges, but were more optimistic when asked for general assessments of the outcomes and usefulness of the climate negotiations. Individuals who were more involved in the negotiation process tended to be more optimistic, especially in terms of general assessments. Our results indicate that two reinforcing effects are at work: a high degree of involvement changes individuals’ perceptions and more optimistic individuals are more inclined to remain involved in the negotiations.
Universe a worldwide survey with 656 respondents from more than 130 countries.
Selection Method Participants were recruited from the two main institutions that the international community has established to address climate change: the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
Data Collection Mode Fixed form self-administered questionnaire: Web-based
Licenses CC BY-NC 4.0
Publications Climate negotiators’ and scientists’ assessments of the climate negotiations, Nature Climate Change, VOL 7, JUNE 2017;10.1038/NCLIMATE3288

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